Show simple item record

dc.contributorMontagna, Paul
dc.contributorPollack, Jennifer
dc.contributorSterba-Boatwright, Blair
dc.creatorEhrmann, Hannah
dc.date2017-11-02T21:32:33Z
dc.date2017-11-02T21:32:33Z
dc.date2017-05
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-22T22:24:06Z
dc.date.available2018-01-22T22:24:06Z
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/5636
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/5636
dc.descriptionThe aim of this study was to quantify the effects of salinity on ecosystem health in Matagorda and San Antonio Bay systems, using benthic macrofauna communities as biological indicators of ecosystem integrity. Benthic and discrete water quality samples were taken monthly at five stations in the San Antonio and Matagorda Bays. Benthic macrofauna community dynamics were linked to salinity to infer the effects of freshwater inflow on the estuarine biotic communities. The benthic communities were classified into two groups based on different salinity habitat zones when salinity was above or below 11. Benthic metrics were significantly correlated with salinity, one-month lag, or two-month lag salinity in all bays. Peak abundances were observed in Carancahua and San Antonio Bays when salinities were 5 and 7 respectively, and peak diversity was observed in San Antonio Bay when salinity was 4. Diversity (Hill’s N1) increased throughout the salinity gradient in Tres Palacios and San Antonio Bays, as did abundance in Tres Palacios Bay. Overall, salinity was a driving factor for these communities. There is a need for hydrological restoration in many areas, and resources for restoration have been made available by the RESTORE Act. However, only small flows may be available to be set aside to maintain ecological health. The present study gives evidence that benthic communities are supported by low salinity habitats within the upper reaches of the San Antonio and Matagorda Bay Systems.
dc.descriptionThe aim of this study was to quantify the effects of salinity on ecosystem health in Matagorda and San Antonio Bay systems, using benthic macrofauna communities as biological indicators of ecosystem integrity. Benthic and discrete water quality samples were taken monthly at five stations in the San Antonio and Matagorda Bays. Benthic macrofauna community dynamics were linked to salinity to infer the effects of freshwater inflow on the estuarine biotic communities. The benthic communities were classified into two groups based on different salinity habitat zones when salinity was above or below 11. Benthic metrics were significantly correlated with salinity, one-month lag, or two-month lag salinity in all bays. Peak abundances were observed in Carancahua and San Antonio Bays when salinities were 5 and 7 respectively, and peak diversity was observed in San Antonio Bay when salinity was 4. Diversity (Hill’s N1) increased throughout the salinity gradient in Tres Palacios and San Antonio Bays, as did abundance in Tres Palacios Bay. Overall, salinity was a driving factor for these communities. There is a need for hydrological restoration in many areas, and resources for restoration have been made available by the RESTORE Act. However, only small flows may be available to be set aside to maintain ecological health. The present study gives evidence that benthic communities are supported by low salinity habitats within the upper reaches of the San Antonio and Matagorda Bay Systems.
dc.descriptionPhysical and Environmental Sciences
dc.descriptionCollege of Science and Engineering
dc.format41 pages.
dc.languageen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with its source. All rights are reserved and retained regardless of current or future development or laws that may apply to fair use standards. Permission for publication of this material, in part or in full, must be secured with the author and/or publisher.
dc.rightsEhrmann, Hannah
dc.subjectbenthic
dc.subjectbioindicator
dc.subjectecosystem health
dc.subjectinflow
dc.subjectmacrofauna
dc.subjectsalinity
dc.titleBenthic macrofauna community response to salinity in the San Antonio and Matagorda Bay systems, Texas
dc.typeText
dc.typeThesis


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record