Political Science in Late Medieval Europe: The Aristotelian Paradigm and How It Shaped the Study of Politics in the West

dc.contributorNederman, Cary J.
dc.creatorSullivan, Mary Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-21T22:03:03Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-22T07:10:45Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-07T19:58:45Z
dc.date.available2011-10-21T22:03:03Z
dc.date.available2011-10-22T07:10:45Z
dc.date.available2017-04-07T19:58:45Z
dc.date.created2010-08
dc.date.issued2011-10-21
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation looks at Aristotelian political thinkers of the later Middle Ages and argues that they meet all of the criteria of a mature Kuhnian science. Scholars of medieval Europe have spent decades arguing over exactly how one should define medieval Aristotelianism and which thinkers qualify as Aristotelian. I answer this question by turning to the philosophy of science literature. By using the criteria laid out by Thomas Kuhn- a common education, a shared technical language and general agreement on problem choice- I am able to parse out a group of political thinkers who qualify as a scientific community. My dissertation then goes on to illustrate how several different medieval thinkers were able to operate within this Aristotelian paradigm. This project gives scholars of the Middle Ages a more useful lens through which to view the phenomenon of medieval Aristotelianism. For those interested in political science more broadly, I demonstrate that our field has, in fact, experienced a period of maturity, in which scholars shared a unified paradigm and proceeded with their research in concert. I also show some of the benefits and limitations of a common research agenda in the study of politics.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-08-8350
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectpolitical theory
dc.subjectmedieval
dc.subjectaristotle
dc.subjecthistory of science
dc.titlePolitical Science in Late Medieval Europe: The Aristotelian Paradigm and How It Shaped the Study of Politics in the West
dc.typeThesis

Files