Double Helix

dc.contributorChristensen, Paul
dc.creatorStumpo, Jeffrey David
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T15:56:52Z
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T20:16:21Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-07T19:59:48Z
dc.date.available2012-07-16T15:56:52Z
dc.date.available2012-07-16T20:16:21Z
dc.date.available2017-04-07T19:59:48Z
dc.date.created2011-05
dc.date.issued2012-07-16
dc.description.abstractDouble Helix approaches the conjunction of visual poetry and long poetry from two distinct but related viewpoints. The first is a scholarly examination of the techniques used to make a long poem visual or a visual poem long. The second is a production of an original long visual poem exhibiting these techniques. The first part, "The Look of the Long Poem," posits that there are five major techniques which are used in long visual poems: line breaks, imagetexts, white space, page division, and collage and montage. These techniques are grounded in the theoretical work of, among others, Katherine O'Brien O'Keeffe, W.J.T Mitchell, Marjorie Perloff, and Johanna Drucker. The techniques are examined in detail as they play out in the work of Anne Carson, David Daniels, Christine Wertheim, Johanna Drucker, Langston Hughes, Ed Dorn, Lisa Jarnot, and Tom Phillips. The second part consists of an original sixty-four-page long poem / poetic sequence titled "diluvium." "diluvium" utilizes all the techniques analyzed in the previous part, attempting furthermore to educate the reader in the process of negotiating its parts as it is read ? that is, to act as a poetics as well as a poem.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-9253
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectvisual poetry
dc.subjectlong poetry
dc.subjectvisual poems
dc.subjectlong poems
dc.subjectvispo
dc.subjectcreative
dc.subjectoriginal
dc.titleDouble Helix
dc.typeThesis

Files