Experimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs

dc.contributorMamora, Daulat D.
dc.contributorSchechter, David S.
dc.creatorSeo, Jeong Gyu
dc.date.accessioned2004-09-30T01:43:22Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-07T19:48:05Z
dc.date.available2004-09-30T01:43:22Z
dc.date.available2017-04-07T19:48:05Z
dc.date.created2003-05
dc.date.issued2004-09-30
dc.description.abstracthe feasibility of sequestering supercritical CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs. The experimental runs involved the following steps. First, the 1 ft long by 1 in. diameter carbonate core is inserted into a viton Hassler sleeve and placed inside an aluminum coreholder that is then evacuated. Second, with or without connate water, the carbonate core is saturated with methane. Third, supercritical CO2 is injected into the core with 300 psi overburden pressure. From the volume and composition of the produced gas measured by a wet test meter and a gas chromatograph, the recovery of methane at CO2 breakthrough is determined. The core is scanned three times during an experimental run to determine core porosity and fluid saturation profile: at start of the run, at CO2 breakthrough, and at the end of the run. Runs were made with various temperatures, 20?C (68?F) to 80?C (176?F), while the cell pressure is varied, from 500 psig (3.55 MPa) to 3000 psig (20.79 MPa) for each temperature. An analytical study of the experimental results has been also conducted to determine the dispersion coefficient of CO2 using the convection-dispersion equation. The dispersion coefficient of CO2 in methane is found to be relatively low, 0.01-0.3 cm2/min.. Based on experimental and analytical results, a 3D simulation model of one eighth of a 5-spot pattern was constructed to evaluate injection of supercritical CO2 under typical field conditions. The depleted gas reservoir is repressurized by CO2 injection from 500 psi to its initial pressure 3,045 psi. Simulation results for 400 bbl/d CO2 injection may be summarized as follows. First, a large amount of CO2 is sequestered: (i) about 1.2 million tons in 29 years (0 % initial water saturation) to 0.78 million tons in 19 years (35 % initial water saturation) for 40-acre pattern, (ii) about 4.8 million tons in 112 years (0 % initial water saturation) to 3.1 million tons in 73 years (35 % initial water saturation) for 80-acre pattern. Second, a significant amount of natural gas is also produced: (i) about 1.2 BSCF or 74 % remaining GIP (0 % initial water saturation) to 0.78 BSCF or 66 % remaining GIP (35 % initial water saturation) for 40-acre pattern, (ii) about 4.5 BSCF or 64 % remaining GIP (0 % initial water saturation) to 2.97 BSCF or 62 % remaining GIP (35 % initial water saturation) for 80-acre pattern. This produced gas revenue could help defray the cost of CO2 sequestration. In short, CO2 sequestration in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a win-win technology.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/135
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University
dc.subjectCO2 sequestration
dc.subjectsupercritical carbon dioxide
dc.subjectdepleted gas reservoir
dc.titleExperimental and simulation studies of sequestration of supercritical carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs
dc.typeBook
dc.typeThesis

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