The politics of charter school authorizing : the case of New York State

dc.contributor.advisorWayman, Jeffrey C.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJellison Holme, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTreisman, Uri R.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRaymond, Margaret E.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMikuta, Julieen
dc.creatorChartock, Jonas S.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-25T17:22:40Zen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T22:26:21Z
dc.date.available2012-07-25T17:22:40Zen
dc.date.available2017-05-11T22:26:21Z
dc.date.issued2012-05en
dc.date.submittedMay 2012en
dc.date.updated2012-07-25T17:22:47Zen
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractDrawing on interview data from charter school policy actors in New York State, this study applied Kingdon’s (1984, 1995/2002) multiple streams model to explain how the system of multiple statewide charter authorizers was created as part of the New York State Charter Schools Act of 1998. A combination of factors influenced the emergence of the law and resulted in an authorizing system that included an effective set of policy entrepreneurs, a strong executive, and a key political opportunity. Ultimately Governor Pataki promoted charter school policy to high agenda prominence by deciding to use the issue as his desired policy in exchange for a legislative pay raise (agenda setting). The findings of the study suggest that the applicability of Kingdon’s national-level model to the state level is valid and features a strong participation of the state executive branch.en
dc.description.departmentEducational Administrationen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.slug2152/ETD-UT-2012-05-5380en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2012-05-5380en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectCharter schoolsen
dc.subjectAuthorizersen
dc.subjectNew York Stateen
dc.titleThe politics of charter school authorizing : the case of New York Stateen
dc.type.genrethesisen

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