The Culture Industry, Hip Hop Music, And The White Perspective: How One Dimensional Representation Of Hip Hop Music Has Influenced White Racial Attitudes

dc.contributorHart, Walter Edwarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-03T23:30:42Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-24T21:43:22Z
dc.date.available2010-03-03T23:30:42Z
dc.date.available2011-08-24T21:43:22Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-03T23:30:42Z
dc.date.submittedJanuary 2009en_US
dc.description.abstractThis theoretical study builds from Ben Agger's theory in his 1992 book, Cultural Studies as Critical Theory:The ideological outcomes of the culture industry are in a sense unintended; they emerge in the interplay of authorial, directorial, and audience assumptions about the nature of the world. (Agger 1992:65)I theorize the effect of the culture industry's cycle of assumptions on the one-dimensional representation of hip hop music and its reflection and reinforcement of Whites' perceptions of Blacks and Black Culture. The reinforcement of Whites' historically negative racial attitudes emerge unintended through a complex cycle of assumptions between the director (culture industry), the author (hip hop artist), and the audience (White consumers).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10106/2060
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.publisherSociologyen_US
dc.titleThe Culture Industry, Hip Hop Music, And The White Perspective: How One Dimensional Representation Of Hip Hop Music Has Influenced White Racial Attitudesen_US
dc.typeM.A.en_US

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