Architecture as a communicator of values and identity: design for a police substation in a minority neighborhood

dc.creatorLambert, Mary Amelia
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-14T23:07:43Z
dc.date.available2011-02-18T22:29:44Z
dc.date.available2016-11-14T23:07:43Z
dc.date.issued1997-12
dc.degree.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.description.abstractArchitecture has the potential of clearly defining the values and identities of its users; civic buildings have traditionally demonstrated such values, along with a feeling of community ownership. However, perception is based on identity and experience, so this is not always the case; for example, a police station sometimes finds itself the object of mistrust and suspicion because of the community's lack of confidence in its police. This design thesis for a police substation in a poor, minority area of Dallas, Texas, seeks to develop a building which could heal the breach in confidence between the neighborhood residents and the police department through user-friendly visual clues and symbols.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/18319en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTexas Tech Universityen_US
dc.rights.availabilityUnrestricted.
dc.subjectDallas (Tex.)en_US
dc.subjectPoliceen_US
dc.subjectNeighborhooden_US
dc.subjectMunicipal buildingsen_US
dc.titleArchitecture as a communicator of values and identity: design for a police substation in a minority neighborhood
dc.typeThesis

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