Personality as a Moderating Variable Between Loss of Relationship and Subjective Well-Being in College Students

dc.contributorDuffy, Michael
dc.creatorSmith, Amanda Artell
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-12T22:31:50Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-14T16:07:42Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-07T19:57:42Z
dc.date.available2010-10-12T22:31:50Z
dc.date.available2010-10-14T16:07:42Z
dc.date.available2017-04-07T19:57:42Z
dc.date.created2010-08
dc.date.issued2010-10-12
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the role of personality variables in the relationship between subjective well-being and loss of relationships through death or parental divorce. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of extraversion, neuroticism, and locus of control as moderating variables between loss of relationship and subjective well-being in college students. Given the prevalence of loss through either death or parental divorce in college students and potential long-term effects on subjective well-being, the current study attempted to further knowledge in this area. Thus, this study aimed to better understand how life events are moderated by personality in influencing an individual?s subjective well-being. This study predicted that individuals who had experienced a loss of relationship would have a lower subjective well-being than individuals who had not experienced a loss of relationship. This hypothesis was not supported by the data which found that individuals who experienced a loss of relationship did not report lower levels of subjective well-being than individuals who had not experienced a loss of relationship. Additionally, it was expected that individuals who reported higher levels of neuroticism and who had an internal locus of control would have a lower subjective well-being. Again, these hypotheses were not supported, and the results indicated that individuals with higher levels of neuroticism also reported higher levels of positive affect and neuroticism was positively correlated with life satisfaction. Furthermore, individuals who reported higher levels of extraversion did not report lower levels of negative affect or life satisfaction. Finally, this study hypothesized that a loss of relationship through death would result in lower levels of subjective well-being. However, the results of this study indicated that individuals with a loss of relationship through death did not report lower levels of subjective well-being when compared to individuals without a loss of relationship through death. The results of this study further the literature on loss of relationship through death and parental divorce and on subjective well-being. This study provides support for the subjective well-being research and provides contrasting findings in regards to personality variables. Limitations of the study and suggestions for future research are also addressed.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-08-8324
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectloss
dc.subjectpersonality
dc.subjectgrief
dc.subjectsubjective well-being
dc.subjectcollege students
dc.subjectparental divorce
dc.titlePersonality as a Moderating Variable Between Loss of Relationship and Subjective Well-Being in College Students
dc.typeBook
dc.typeThesis

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