Degrees of abstraction in French and English generic nouns : an analysis of word association tasks

dc.contributor.advisorBlyth, Carl S. (Carl Stewart), 1958-en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRussi, Cinziaen
dc.creatorHirsh, Timothy Williamen
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-21T15:52:00Zen
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-21T15:52:06Zen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T22:21:26Z
dc.date.available2011-02-21T15:52:00Zen
dc.date.available2011-02-21T15:52:06Zen
dc.date.available2017-05-11T22:21:26Z
dc.date.issued2010-12en
dc.date.submittedDecember 2010en
dc.date.updated2011-02-21T15:52:06Zen
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractIn language, there exists a distinction between abstract words and concrete words. It can be said that abstract words refer to generic concepts, while concrete words pertain to physical actions or objects associated with physical movement. With respect to the linguistic community, it is often claimed that French words function at a higher degree of abstraction than English words. However, this claim lacks empirical evidence. The present study aims to examine the usage of concrete and abstract words in word association tasks, which are part of Cultura: an intercultural, web-based project that brings foreign language students from different countries and linguistic backgrounds together in a telecollaborative exchange of ideas. Specifically, this study examines the degrees of abstraction of generic nouns in French and English.en
dc.description.departmentFrench and Italianen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-12-2347en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectFrenchen
dc.subjectEnglishen
dc.subjectAbstractionen
dc.subjectConcretenessen
dc.subjectAbstract nounsen
dc.subjectConcrete nounsen
dc.subjectComputer mediated communicationen
dc.titleDegrees of abstraction in French and English generic nouns : an analysis of word association tasksen
dc.type.genrethesisen

Files