A shattered visage: the remythologizing of the British literary hero after World War I

dc.creatorMcLure, Victoria Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-14T23:08:11Z
dc.date.available2011-02-18T22:48:38Z
dc.date.available2016-11-14T23:08:11Z
dc.date.issued1999-05
dc.degree.departmentEnglishen_US
dc.description.abstractHeroes have always been a part of national culture. They have slain real and metaphorical dragons and provided the populace with models to emulate and admire. However, there is a dark side to this hero worship. While heroes are a necessary and desirable aspect of any culture, their influence can sometimes prove damaging because their model is unrealistic and when people fall short of that model, disillusionment, sometimes on a grand scale, can occur.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346/18894en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTexas Tech Universityen_US
dc.rights.availabilityUnrestricted.
dc.subjectWar and literature -- Great Britainen_US
dc.subjectWorld War, 1914-1918 -- Propaganda, Britishen_US
dc.subjectPopular music -- Great Britain -- 1911-1920 -- History and criticismen_US
dc.subjectHeroes in literatureen_US
dc.subjectEnglish literature -- 20th century -- History and criticismen_US
dc.titleA shattered visage: the remythologizing of the British literary hero after World War I
dc.typeDissertation

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