Cosmetic surgery media, marketing and advertising requires more regulation

dc.contributor.advisorDrumwright, Minette E.en
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLove, Braden
dc.creatorNelson, Katelyn Christineen
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-29T22:26:56Zen
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-29T22:27:02Zen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T22:20:46Z
dc.date.available2010-11-29T22:26:56Zen
dc.date.available2010-11-29T22:27:02Zen
dc.date.available2017-05-11T22:20:46Z
dc.date.issued2010-05en
dc.date.submittedMay 2010en
dc.date.updated2010-11-29T22:27:02Zen
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThe marketing, advertising and mediation of cosmetic surgery in the United States has become a controversial issue. The debate began with the normalization of unrealistic beauty images due to excessive exposure to cosmetic surgery in the media and consumer self-diagnosis. Surgeons use aggressive marketing tactics for preventative procedures and prey on insecurities. Moreover, the proliferation of cosmetic surgery in the media in conjunction with misleading advertising has created an environment where consumers have false and unrealistic expectations and perceptions of cosmetic surgery. This article discusses the history of cosmetic surgery, marketing and advertising tactics as well as mediated theory to understand the ethical issues involved in elective surgery. The goal of this paper is to suggest regulation and protection for vulnerable audiences.en
dc.description.departmentAdvertisingen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2010-05-1389en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectCosmetic surgeryen
dc.subjectAdvertisingen
dc.subjectMediaen
dc.titleCosmetic surgery media, marketing and advertising requires more regulationen
dc.type.genrethesisen

Files