An Exploratory Study of the Relationship Between Exercise Leader Source Credibility, Participant Self-Efficacy, and Exercise Adherence

dc.contributorStephenson, Michael T.
dc.creatorGadberry, Kacy L.
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-12T22:31:08Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-14T16:00:20Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-07T19:57:28Z
dc.date.available2010-10-12T22:31:08Z
dc.date.available2010-10-14T16:00:20Z
dc.date.available2017-04-07T19:57:28Z
dc.date.created2009-08
dc.date.issued2010-10-12
dc.description.abstractUsing Social Cognitive Theory, Social Identity Theory, and Source Credibility, this study examined the role of instructor source credibility as related to exercise adherence. A one-time survey was given to participants of an eight-week exercise program. Hierarchical multiple linear regression was used to test hypotheses. Results indicate that perceived expertise was a significant predictor of intentions to adhere to class. Additionally, this study shows how Social Identity Theory can predict lower levels of identification in an exercise context. The scales used to text source credibility were shown to be accurate measures of perceived instructor expertise, likeability, and enthusiasm. Thus, these scales can be used to examine this subject in later studies.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-08-881
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectSocial Cognitive Theory
dc.subjectSource Credibility
dc.subjectSocial Identity Theory
dc.subjectSelf-Efficacy
dc.subjectExercise Adherence
dc.titleAn Exploratory Study of the Relationship Between Exercise Leader Source Credibility, Participant Self-Efficacy, and Exercise Adherence
dc.typeBook
dc.typeThesis

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