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dc.contributor.advisorEoff, Shirley M
dc.contributor.advisorWatts, Deanna J
dc.contributor.advisorBartl, Anthony
dc.creatorMoore, Donald D.
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-27T17:02:31Z
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-16T18:45:28Z
dc.date.available2015-05-27T17:02:31Z
dc.date.available2018-02-16T18:45:28Z
dc.date.created2015-05
dc.date.submittedMay 2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346.1/30382
dc.description.abstractThis study sought to extend research on presidential transitions and the rhetoric used during that time period. It pooled three speeches from eight different presidents and analyzed the rhetoric used therein. Speeches were put into the text-to-image software Wordle, giving a displayed and analytical representation of the speech. Then, speeches were coded for several variables, including the tone of certain rhetoric and the frequency of policy mentioned in each speech. The results of this study showed that while the nomination speeches and victory speeches all employed fairly similar in rhetoric, State of the Union speeches given by each president was unique to their own transition and rhetorical style, and often times focused on specific policy goals of importance to the individual president rather than the party to which they belonged. This shows the institutional nature of the presidency but also indicates that presidents add their uniqueness to the office.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectpresidential rhetoric
dc.subjectpresidential transitions
dc.subjectpresidential speeches
dc.titleSOUNDING PRESIDENTIAL IN THE MODERN ERA: RHETORICAL SHIFTS FROM THE NOMINATING CONVENTION TO THE WHITE HOUSE
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.materialtext
dc.date.updated2015-05-27T17:02:32Z


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