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dc.contributor.advisorWolf, Stacy Ellenen
dc.identifier.oclc69108617en
dc.creatorPasternack, Leslie Joyceen
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-28T22:36:30Zen
dc.date.available2008-08-28T22:36:30Zen
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.identifierb6084078xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/2180en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThis study documents and analyzes the work of several variety acts of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries: the Russell Brothers, who were famous for their Irish Servant Girls characters before coming under attack by Irish American protestors; James McIntyre and Thomas Heath, who performed various blackface characters on the vaudeville stage long after minstrelsy waned; and Harrigan and Hart, whose musical plays included a multitude of ethnic types in an exaggerated mirror of the immigrant slums of New York. Each of these acts included female impersonation as a prominent component, and also created detailed “race delineations.” Every one of these performers was accorded expert status in the popular press as authorities on the behavior, dialect and slang of the racial group they depicted. These acts also all experienced a decline in popularity as female comedians, chorus girls, and glamour drag queens staked out theatrical territories in the twentieth century. Of these acts, only Harrigan and Hart have received extensive biographical attention; but the strange production history of Michael Stewart’s Harrigan ‘n Hart illustrates the effects of sexual anxiety on the writing of theatrical biography. Not until the 1990s would performers of multiple ethnicities and genders, such as John Leguizamo, Tracey Ullman, and Anna Deavere Smith, regain mainstream currency as authorities on race relations and sexuality. This study correlates the decline of a rich period of multivalent social impersonation with shifting perceptions of homosexuality, gender play, class consciousness and racial identity in the United States.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subject.lcshFemale impersonators--United States--Historyen
dc.subject.lcshStereotypes (Social psychology)--United States--Historyen
dc.subject.lcshNational characteristics in the theater--Historyen
dc.subject.lcshRacism and the arts--United States--Historyen
dc.subject.lcshVaudeville--United States--Historyen
dc.subject.lcshHomosexuality in the theater--United States--Historyen
dc.subject.lcshHarrigan & Harten
dc.subject.lcshRussell Brothers (Vaudeville act)en
dc.subject.lcshMcIntyre, James,--actoren
dc.subject.lcshHeath, Thomas,--actoren
dc.titleTheatrical transvestism in the United States and the performance of American identities, 1870-1935en
dc.description.departmentTheatre and Danceen
dc.type.genreThesisen
dc.identifier.proqst3144670en


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