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dc.contributor.advisorDr. David H. Walkeren_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDr. Xue-jie Yuen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDr. Lawrence Stanberryen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDr. Johnny Petersonen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDr. Guy Palmeren_US
dc.creatorScott Wesley Longen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-20T16:04:28Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-19T22:05:00Z
dc.date.available2009-06-09en_US
dc.date.available2011-12-20T16:04:28Z
dc.date.available2014-02-19T22:05:00Z
dc.date.created2007-03-29en_US
dc.date.issued2006-06-05en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-03292007-214452en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/71
dc.description.abstract<i>Ehrlichia chaffeensis</i> is a gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium which parasitizes cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in mammals. <i>E. chaffeensis</i> possesses a unique cell wall that lacks LPS and the classical peptidoglycan found in other gram-negative bacteria. <i>Ehrlichia</i> reside inside unique membrane-bound vacuoles in the cytoplasm of host cells, known as morulae. <i>E. chaffeensis</i> is transmitted by lone star ticks, <i>Amblyomma americanum</i>, and is not transmitted transovarially, but is maintained in the environment by persistent infection of animal hosts. <i>E. chaffeensis</i> causes the emerging infectious disease, human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME), a potentially fatal illness. Although easily treated with tetracycline, due to its obligate intracellular parasitism it is difficult to diagnose by routine clinical methods. <i>E. chaffeensis</i> expresses a 28 kDa outer membrane protein from a multigene family known as P28/OMP-1. Different alleles from this multigene family are expressed in different host cell types, but the role of this membrane protein remains unknown. Also, few host cell receptors, as well as host-pathogen protein interactions, have been identified for <i>E. chaffeensis</i>. Genetic manipulation of the family Anaplasmataceae has not been previously achieved, significantly hampering ehrlichial research. In this work, we describe a method for the transformation of the genus <i>Ehrlichia</i>, and apply this method to study the role of the P28 in ehrlichial pathogenesis by development of a knockout strain. Furthermore, we identify a novel host cell receptor implicated in ehrlichial binding and infection of host cells.en_US
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the TDL web site by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en_US
dc.subjecthost-pathogen interactionsen_US
dc.subjectgenetic manipulationen_US
dc.subjectfamily Anaplasmataceaeen_US
dc.titleThe role of the P28 multigene family in the pathogenesis of Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection.en_US
dc.type.genredissertationen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas Medical Branchen_US
thesis.degree.departmentExperimental Pathologyen_US


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