Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKenneth Ottenbacher, Ph.D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRonald Angel, Ph.D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberM. Kristen Peek, Ph.D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLaura Ray, M.P.A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJudith Drew, Ph.D., R.N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGayle Weaver, Ph.D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberElbert Whorton, M.S., Ph.D.en_US
dc.creatorMary Ellen E. Kuhlmannen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-20T16:05:40Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-19T22:05:47Z
dc.date.available2008-12-10en_US
dc.date.available2011-12-20T16:05:40Z
dc.date.available2014-02-19T22:05:47Z
dc.date.created2008-12-03en_US
dc.date.issued2008-11-19en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-12032008-121713en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/281
dc.description.abstractAbstract: The purpose of this study is to examine acculturation and disability in Mexican American older adults living independently in the southwestern United States. Design: A prospective cohort study (1993-2005). Setting: Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California. Participants: Participants in the Hispanic Established Population for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE), a population-based sample of 3050 non-institutionalized Mexican-American men and women aged 65 and over. Measures: Variables included three measures of acculturation (English proficiency, English usage, and Mainstream contact), risk factors (age, gender, education, marital status, and BMI), disablement process factors (chronic pathology, cognitive status, and physical performance), and activities of daily living disability (ADLs), and instrumental activities of daily living disability (IADLs). Chi-Square, Chi-Square test for trends, ordinary least squares regression and discrete hazard analyses were used to identify associations of measures of acculturation with incidence of ADL and IADL disability. Results: There was a significant association between one measure of acculturation (English proficiency) and incidence of IADL disability, which remained after adding risk factors and Disablement process variables to the model. Conclusion: The findings support the importance of acculturation when examining ADL and IADL disability. Interventions that consider acculturation may be useful in reducing ADL and IADL disability in Mexican American older adults.en_US
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the TDL web site by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en_US
dc.subjectMexican American older adultsen_US
dc.subjectIADLen_US
dc.subjectADLen_US
dc.subjectacculturationen_US
dc.titleAcculturation and disability in Mexican American older adultsen_US
dc.type.genredissertationen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
thesis.degree.namePhDen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas Medical Branchen_US
thesis.degree.departmentPreventative Medicine and Community Healthen_US


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView
Kuhlmann12-1-08proqfinal.pdf596.3Kbapplication/pdfView/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record