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dc.contributorOliver, Marvarene
dc.contributorFernandez, Mary Alice
dc.contributorLenz, A. Stephen
dc.contributorMurphy, Susan
dc.creatorKlassen, Samantha Lynn
dc.date2017-11-02T20:40:31Z
dc.date2017-11-02T20:40:31Z
dc.date2017-05
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-22T22:24:06Z
dc.date.available2018-01-22T22:24:06Z
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/5632
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/5632
dc.descriptionA dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of DOCTOR of PHILOSOPHY in Counselor Education from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi in Corpus Christi, Texas.
dc.descriptionConcerns with body image and disordered eating behaviors are pervasive in today’s society. Recent cohorts of preteen girls experience increased risks in relationship to developing eating disorders due to changes in pubertal development and the widespread impact of social media. This dissertation describes a mindfulness-based eating disorder prevention program for preteens which integrates wellness practices such as mindful eating and noncompetitive exercise with awareness-building conversations about the messages society sends to girls and women about their bodies. Results of this qualitative phenomenological investigation revealed seven main themes: (a) body talk, (b) food, exercise, and healthy choices, (c) societal expectations, (d) mindfulness, (e) being in the group, (f) changes experienced as a result of group participation, and (g) what I learned and want others to know. These results are similar to those observed in previous studies of eating disorder prevention and expand knowledge related to participants’ perceptions of how their relationships with their bodies, food, and exercise change over the course of program participation. Results also provide support for the inclusion of targeted mindfulness interventions to foster the regulation of emotions related to one’s body and healthy engagement with food and exercise. This information is valuable in terms of providing support for a combined approach to eating disorder prevention, demonstrating the benefits of dissonance education and mindfulness-based interventions in supporting body acceptance for young women.
dc.descriptionCounseling & Educational Psychology
dc.descriptionCollege of Education and Human Development
dc.format128 pages.
dc.languageen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with its source. All rights are reserved and retained regardless of current or future development or laws that may apply to fair use standards. Permission for publication of this material, in part or in full, must be secured with the author and/or publisher.
dc.rightsKlassen, Samantha Lynn
dc.subjectdisordered eating
dc.subjecteating disorders
dc.subjectmindfulness
dc.subjectpreadolescence
dc.subjectprevention
dc.titleExperiences of preadolescent girls participating in a mindfulness-based eating disorder prevention group
dc.typeText
dc.typeDissertation


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