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dc.creatorEdwards, Rachel R.
dc.date2017-03-14T15:58:27Z
dc.date2017-03-14T15:58:27Z
dc.date2016-12
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-22T22:24:00Z
dc.date.available2018-01-22T22:24:00Z
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/1134
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.6/1134
dc.descriptionA thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER of SCIENCE in COASTAL AND MARINE SYSTEM SCIENCE from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi in Corpus Christi, Texas.
dc.descriptionThe Galveston Bay region in Texas is at particular risk of sea level rise (SLR) induced hazards because of its unique geography and geology, including relatively high subsidence rates due to mineral and groundwater extractions. SLR is an exceptionally difficult public policy problem because shorelines have a dynamic nature while typically laws are static. This study examines the effects that four different development strategies could have on landscape structure. Using the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM), the possible effects of SLR under four development strategy scenarios and three SLR scenarios are examined in four regional subsites that each represents a different natural and built environment. The scenarios are (1) “Armoring Removed” which serves as a control and employs no shoreline protection, (2) Current Armored Shoreline which models the current situation regarding development and armoring, (3) Green Infrastructure which shows what may happen if living shorelines were used instead of armoring, and (4) All Armored (AA) which describes the armoring of the entire site. SLAMM predicted that Developed and Undeveloped Uplands were greatest under the AA scenario and that Marshes and Flats were greatest under the LS scenario. The predictions that armoring would protect uplands and LS would result in more marshes is expected given knowledge of how these strategies work. Action should be taken immediately to develop policies that foster resiliency and avoid the worst outcomes for both human and natural wetland communities in Galveston Bay. This work is part of a larger study on living with sea level rise along the Texas coast.
dc.descriptionPhysical and Environmental Sciences
dc.descriptionCollege of Science and Engineering
dc.languageen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with its source. All rights are reserved and retained regardless of current or future development or laws that may apply to fair use standards. Permission for publication of this material, in part or in full, must be secured with the author and/or publisher.
dc.titleRISING ABOVE: IMPACTS OF COASTAL POLICIES WITH RESPECT TO SEA LEVEL RISE IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS
dc.typeText
dc.typeThesis


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