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dc.contributorParnell, Jr., Calvin B.
dc.creatorBotlaguduru, Venkata Sai V.
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-15T00:16:00Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-23T21:46:51Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-07T19:57:20Z
dc.date.available2010-07-15T00:16:00Z
dc.date.available2010-07-23T21:46:51Z
dc.date.available2017-04-07T19:57:20Z
dc.date.created2009-12
dc.date.issued2010-07-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-12-7600
dc.description.abstractEmission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for Emission factors (EFs) and results from dispersion models are key components in the air pollution regulatory process. The EPA preferred regulatory model changed from ISCST3 to AERMOD in November, 2007. Emission factors are used in conjunction with dispersion models to predict 24-hour concentrations that are compared to National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for determining the required control systems in permitting sources. This change in regulatory models has had an impact on the regulatory process and the industries regulated. In this study, EFs were developed for regulated particulate matter PM10 and PM2.5 from cotton harvesting. Measured concentrations of TSP and PM10 along with meteorological data were used in conjunction with the dispersion models ISCST3 and AERMOD, to determine the emission fluxes from cotton harvesting. The goal of this research was to document differences in emission factors as a consequence of the models used. The PM10 EFs developed for two-row and six-row pickers were 154 + 43 kg/km2 and 425 + 178 kg/km2, respectively. From the comparison between AERMOD and ISCST3, it was observed that AERMOD EFs were 1.8 times higher than ISCST3 EFs for absence of solar radiation. Using AERMOD predictions of pollutant concentrations off property for regulatory purposes will likely affect a source?s ability to comply with limits set forth by State Air Pollution Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAs) and could lead to inappropriate regulation of the source.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectdispersion modeling
dc.subjectAERMOD
dc.subjectISCST3
dc.subjectemission factors
dc.subjectagricultural emissions
dc.subjectparticulate matter
dc.titleComparison of Aermod and ISCST3 Models for Particulate Emissions from Ground Level Sources
dc.typeBook
dc.typeThesis


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