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dc.contributorVilleda, Yajairaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-14T20:54:19Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-24T21:45:03Z
dc.date.available2011-07-14T20:54:19Z
dc.date.available2011-08-24T21:45:03Z
dc.date.issued2011-07-14
dc.date.submittedJanuary 2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10106/5863
dc.description.abstractMental health needs for immigrants are complicated by previous trauma and living in a new country. This study examined acculturative stress (AS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among immigrants by conducting a secondary data analysis of the 2002 to 2003 National Latino American and Asian American Study (N=3,259). The primary acculturative stressors identified were limited contact with family and friends, difficulties interacting with others due to language limitations and not receiving the same respect as in the country of origin. Latinos experienced more acculturative stress than Asians. Measures of sex, age, race, education, age of immigration, length of stay in the U.S. were used as independent variables to assess differences between Latinos and Asians in both PTSD and AS. Latinos experienced more AS factors than Asians and Asians experienced more PTSD than Latinos. Implications and recommendations for social work practice and policy are discussed along with recommendations for future research.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSocial Worken_US
dc.titleAcculturative Stress And Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Among Latino And Asian Immigrantsen_US
dc.typeM.S.en_US


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